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Newbie Dispatcher HERE...lol

Posted by Omega Transport Services, LLC on April 21, 2020 at 5:25 PM Comments comments (0)

Hello everyone my name is Ramon I just joined the community and look forward to meeting and networking with you all. I just retired from the US Army and moved to Cantonment, FL and looking forward to the next chapter of my life. Feel free to reach out to me anytime. Thanks

CARRIERS ARE YOU GETTING PAID SAME DAY AS YOUR DROP?

Posted by 01 McCulin Transportation Management on April 21, 2020 at 5:00 AM Comments comments (0)

Thank you for choosing McCulin Transport Management as your dispatching resource.

 

 

 

ARE YOU GETTING PAID “SAME DAY” AS YOUR DROP?

 

 

 

We give you access to “SAME DAY CASH” with our Carrier Factoring Program you no longer have to wait days or even weeks to get paid, with McCulin Transport Management by your side we get you paid “SAME DAY” as your drop & receiving your BOL within 3 hours, in some cases as fast as 60 minutes.

 

 

 

Welcome to McCulin Transport Management where we have access to thousands of loads daily keeping truckers on the road making GOOD MONEY!

 

 

 

McCulin Transport Management is part of the NATIONAL DISPATCHERS NETWORK of over 3000 DISPATCHERS and BROKERS with over 35 years experience dedicated to help find HIGH PAYING freight for owner operators like yourself...

 

 

 

Our main focus:

 

 

 

HOW MUCH MONEY DO YOU NEED TO MOVE YOUR TRUCK...?

 

 

 

Nobody likes to run cheap freight right?

 

 

 

So with us as your Transport Business Managers we send you a dispatch agreement and a profile sheet,

 

 

 

You're basically going to give us your “TRUCKERS WISH LIST”,

 

 

 

You're going to tell us how much MONEY you want to make,

 

You're going to tell us how far and exactly where you want to go,

 

And you're going to tell us how much WEIGHT you want to pull, and if we can't find EXACTLY what you want you won't ever hear from us...

 

 

 

So when you see our number on your caller I.D. you know we're calling with the MONEY you want to make,

 

with a load going where you want to go no questions asked, now that makes sense doesn't it?

 

 

 

CONTACT US NOW ABOUT OUR SUB-DEDICATED ROUTES!

 

 

 

Make it home every night for dinner and work a local M-F schedule in the state of your choice and have your weekends for you and your family!

 

 

 

We take drivers from $1500-3500 per week to $4500-7500+ per week with our Sub-Dedicated “State Of The Art” Transportation Management Program.

 

 

 

WE'RE ALWAYS HERE FOR YOU!

 

 

 

Our National Dispatchers Network is Built By Owner Operators For Owner Operators!

 

So we understand; “Every Carrier Is Unique in Their Load Pricing Needs”

 

Our “Network of Dispatchers” will cater their load search to your pricing requirements.

 

In Other Words; if you need $2.75 CPM to Run a Load; Our Dispatchers Will Only Look For & Contact You With Offers of $2.75 CPM or Better!

 

 

 

So Contact McCulin Transport Management today...

 

 

 

*****SHIPPERS*****

 

 

 

Why Should You Partner With McCulin Transport Management a Member Of "THE NATIONAL DISPATCHERS NETWORK"?

 

 

 

The Network Utilizes the most advanced technology in the industry to service out customers.

 

 

 

We've integrated The AscendTMS "Transportation Management Systems and Logistics Software" in all 67 active independent dispatch firms strategically positioned throughout the United States to adequately service all major shipping lanes. We can manage every aspect of our logistics and distribution operations with the same transportation management system (TMS) technology used by the worlds largest companies.

 

 

 

Carrier Verification / Fraud Check

 

 

 

Never load a bad carrier or bad driver again. Each of our network members can instantly conduct full carrier verification, carrier qualification, and fraud detection. We conduct real-time fraud detection and carrier qualification every time we match carriers or drivers to one of your loads.

 

 

 

Driver Track & Trace via Cell Phone GPS

 

 

 

GPS load tracking? Yes, we have that - and it's built into every network member's system.

 

 

 

We can pin-point the exact location of a driver just by using their cell phone's GPS. Tracker feature sends them a special text message and we simply grab their location and the status of the load for you. Drivers can also respond from their phone with the real-time status of the load with one press. NO APPS NEEDED - just our special text message! We can also use this feature to send any othe instructions to a driver via stansard text message.

 

 

 

Automatic Route Review & Load Optimization

 

 

 

With Automated Route Review (ARR) you wont have to worry if our stops are ordered in the most efficient manner. The National Network of Dispatchers does that for you, every load, every time! ARR checks the original route to make sure that the miles have been optimized. if there is a shorter, more efficient route ARR will let us know - even if you re-order or add stops on the fly. We can then choose between the original route or the more efficient ARR route.

 

 

 

This it just one of the many great tools we utilize to make sure that your loads are routed efficiently, saving you miles, thus saving you money.

 

 

 

Our National Dispatcher's Network Members are all trained & committed to placing the need and concerns of the customers, they service, above all else!

 

 

 

Our focus is to provide quality service with the highest levels of customer satisfaction.

 

 

 

We look forward to building a business relationship and providing seamless door to door transportation solutions for your business.

 

 

 

And the great thing about this is, we are dispatchers so this doesn't cost you any more money, we get paid by the carrier and we'll be happy to provide this service to you, all you have to do is send us over your load list every morning.

 

 

 

MCCULIN TRANSPORT MANAGEMENT

 

E.I.N. #82-2561582

What Truckers pull (knowledge base)

Posted by 01 McCulin Transportation Management on April 5, 2020 at 1:55 PM Comments comments (0)
�??Trucking Agents work with a number of different types of trailers in the trucking industry and we included a list of some below. Each trailer type offers it's own specific use. In most cases, the trailers can vary in size, weight, axles, and in other ways making each trailer type varied more than what is shown here. �??Different trailer types require specific knowledge and understanding in order to dispatch the driver and equipment effectively. �??A Note On Dimensions * Dimensions are averages or what you are likely to see. Equipment can vary. �??* Dimensions are listed in either Feet & Inches or Inches Only to match industry lingo. * Legal commodity dimensions are provided where appropriate (platform trailers). �??* Legal dimensions based on a max overall height of 13'6"�??. �??A Note On Accessories �??* Accessorials can include equipment (hardware) and services. �??* There are a broad range of accessories and this is not a complete list. �??Van Trailer van-trailer-type �??Dimensions �??Commodity Weight: 45,000 lbs �??Outside Dimensions �??Length: 53' Width: 8'6" Height: 13'6" �??Inside Dimensions �??Length: 52'7" Width: 98" Height: 110" �??Description �??A van trailer is the most common trailer type out there. It is primarily used to haul Freight All Kinds (FAK) of palletized goods. Typically loaded via a loading dock with a forklift, with most long haul trailers offering swing doors for easiest access to loading. Van freight is the easiest to dispatch for reasons such as: �??Fewer concerns about dimensions Commodities No tarping Loading and unloading is generally straight forward. More consistent rates �??�??Accessories Air-Ride Straps Logistics Bars Curtain Side E-Track Load Bars Pads Hazmat Expedited / Team Less Than Truckload (LTL) Multiple Stops �??Refrigerated Trailer refrigerated trailer type �??Dimensions �??Commodity Weight: 44,000 lbs Outside Dimensions �??Length: 53' Width: 8'6" Height: 13'6" �??Inside Dimensions �??Length: 52' Width: 98" Height: 104" �??Description �??A refrigerated trailer is often called a "Refer Trailer" but would be more accurately defined as a temperature controlled trailer. The most distinguishing characteristic of a refer trailer as compared to a van trailer is the temperature control unit found on the front of the trailer. This unit will regulate the inside temperature of the trailer and keep it consistent to the commodity requirements. Because of the more specialized trailer a more experienced dispatcher is required. Rates are also higher for this more specialized trailer. �??Flatbed Trailer flatbed trailer type �??Dimensions Commodity Weight: 48,000 lbs �??Trailer Dimensions �??Length: 48' Width: 102" (8'6") Deck Height: 5' �??Commodity Legal Dimensions �??Length: 48' some overhang Width: 102" (8'6") �??Height: 8'6" Oversize Hauling is available �??Description �??A flatbed trailer is the most basic of open deck trailers or platform trailers. They offer a wide variety of hauling commodities, loading options, and accessorials. The biggest advantage is the ability to load from the side (forklift) or overhead (crane). A dispatcher needs to be well versed in all aspects of this trailer type to dispatch effectively. Rates can vary due to many factors. �??�??Accessories �??Tarp Chains & Binders Straps �??Side Kit Coil Racks �??Headboard �??Blocking Pipe Stakes Hazmat �??Stepdeck Trailer stepdeck trailer type Dimensions Commodity Weight: 46,000 lbs �??Trailer Dimensions �??Deck Length: 53' Primary Deck Length: 40' Width: 102" (8'6") Deck Height: 42" (3'6") �??Commodity Legal Dimensions �??Length: 40' Width: 102" (8'6") �??Height: 10' Oversize Hauling is available Description �??A stepdeck, or dropdeck trailer, is a flatbed with a lower bottom primary deck. This lower deck allows to take higher commodity height items without having to order any over-height permits. The sacrifice is some hauling weight, but more likely available lower deck length. Historically, a stepdeck trailer was 48' long, but many fleets are going to the 53' trailer with 40' or more bottom decks. One advantage of this extra length is the ability to haul shipping containers. Otherwise, a stepdeck trailer is very familiar with a flatbed and they are often interchangeable on hauling many loads. More Step Deck Detail �??�??Accessories �??Tarp Chains & Binders Straps �??Coil Racks �??Levelers Hazmat �??Blocking Pipe Stakes Ramps �??Double Drop Trailer double drop trailer type Dimensions Commodity Weight: 42,000 lbs �??Trailer Dimensions �??Deck Length: 48' Primary Deck Length: 29' Width: 102" (8'6") Deck Height: 18" (1'6") �??Commodity Legal Dimensions �??Length: 29' plus overhang Width: 102" (8'6") �??Height: 12' Oversize Hauling is available Description �??A double drop is an even more specialized platform trailer. Some double drops can take up to 12' high loads without the need of over-height permits. Most double drop trailers have an RGN, which is a removable gooseneck, which allows for both wheeled and tracked equipment to be driven onto the trailer under their own power. Many driver's of this specialized equipment are well versed in the hauling of oversize and overweight loads which can require permits and escorts. �??�??Accessories �??Chains & Binders Straps �??Outriggers �??RGN�?? �??Blocking Tarp

25 Freight Codes for beginners

Posted by 01 McCulin Transportation Management on April 5, 2020 at 1:40 PM Comments comments (0)
Commonly Used Freight Codes On The Load Boards 1. V (Dry Van) 2. F (Flatbed) 3. R (Reefer) 4. SD (Step Deck/Single Drop) 5. DD (Double Drop) 6. RGN (Removable Gooseneck) 7. MX (Maxi Flat) 8. VV (Van+Vented) 9. VA (Van+Airride) 10. VINT (Van+Intermodal) 11. FINT (Flat+Intermodal) 12. RINT (Reefer+Intermodal) 13. CV (Curtain Van) 14. CONT (Container) 15. HS (Hotshot) 16. CRG (Cargo Van) 17. DT (Dump Trailer) 18. AC (Auto Carrier) 19. HB (Hopper Bottom) 20. TNK (Tanker) 21. LB (Lowboy) 22. LA (Landall) 23. FS (Flat+Sides) 24. FT (Flat+Tarp) 25. PO (Power Only)

How Do I Pay Myself in a Single-Member LLC or S Corporation? - All Up In Yo' Business

Posted by Linda McCoy -McCoy & Associates LLC on November 1, 2019 at 9:15 AM Comments comments (0)
How Do I Pay Myself in a Single-Member LLC or S Corporation?
- All Up In Yo' Business

.

180 Law Co. LLC

Contact Aiden and learn more at www.180lawco.com.   

WATCH THE VIDEO -  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWkbJs3XLrs

[email protected] | 720-379-3425

One question that I get asked quite often, because it’s a really good question, is how the owner of a single-member LLC is supposed to pay him/herself. There are two possible answers to this question, depending on if the LLC is taxed as a sole proprietorship or an S Corporation.
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Unless the LLC elects otherwise, a single-member LLC is considered a “disregarded entity” and all of the income to the LLC is treated as income to the business owner, and is all subject to self-employment tax. So basically, the owner of a single-member LLC can pay himself however and whenever he wants, keeping in mind a few important considerations:
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1. Make sure you are prepared to pay taxes. Since the LLC is a disregarded entity, if the business earns $100k but you only “pay” yourself $50k, you are still going to be responsible for paying all of the taxes, including self-employment taxes, on the full $100k. (For simplicity’s sake, I am pretending there are no deductions or anything.) So you need to set aside enough money to make sure you can cover your taxes.
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2. The business has to remain adequately capitalized. This means that you need to keep enough money in the business to cover all your overhead, debts, bills, salary for employees, etc. You should also leave some extra “padding” for possibly building up your business, purchasing equipment, and whatever else you may decide to do with your business.
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In the books, any payments to yourself should be recorded as “Member Distribution” or “Member Withdrawal.”
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If the LLC elects to be taxed as an S Corporation, on the other hand, you have to be paid a “reasonable” salary. Self-employment taxes will only be paid on that salary rather than on the full amount of profit the business earns. Any money that the business owner takes above that reasonable salary is considered a dividend and won’t be subject to self-employment taxes. To learn more about S Corporations, watch my earlier video What the Heck is an S Corporation at http://youtu.be/i5to7Da3wMw?list=UUNh...
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If your LLC is not taxed as an S Corp, you don’t need to put yourself on payroll, since those member distributions aren’t treated as normal payroll. If your LLC is taxed as an S Corp, then the salary you earn can be part of your payroll, and any additional dividends will be separate from that.
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Whether or not you elect to have your LLC taxed as an S Corp and how to handle and record the money that you pay yourself is an important conversation that should be had with your accountant, bookkeeper, & attorney. Doing it the “right” way can help minimize your tax liability and can make your life (and that of your accountant) much easier come tax time.
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The information provided in this video should not be construed or relied on as legal advice for any specific fact or circumstance. Its content was prepared by 180 Law Co. LLC, with its principal office located at 10200 E. Girard Ave. Ste. A308 Denver, CO 80231. This video is designed for entertainment and information purposes only. Viewing this video does not create an attorney-client relationship 180 Law Co. LLC or any of its lawyers. You should not act or rely on any of the information contained herein without seeking professional legal advice.

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Most Frequently Used Freight Codes:

Posted by William McKenzie on November 1, 2019 at 12:05 AM Comments comments (0)

Commonly Used

Freight Codes

On The

Load Boards


1. V (Dry Van)

2. F (Flatbed)

3. R (Reefer)

4. SD (Step Deck/Single Drop)

5. DD (Double Drop)

6. RGN (Removable Gooseneck)

7. MX (Maxi Flat)

8. VV (Van+Vented)

9. VA (Van+Airride)

10. VINT (Van+Intermodal)

11. FINT (Flat+Intermodal)

12. RINT (Reefer+Intermodal)

13. CV (Curtain Van)

14. CONT (Container)

15. HS (Hotshot)

16. CRG (Cargo Van)

17. DT (Dump Trailer)

18. AC (Auto Carrier)

19. HB (Hopper Bottom)

20. TNK (Tanker)

21. LB (Lowboy)

22. LA (Landall)

23. FS (Flat+Sides)

24. FT (Flat+Tarp)

25. PO (Power Only)

26. Other (Not List)



Axle Weight

Posted by Linda McCoy -McCoy & Associates LLC on October 18, 2019 at 7:40 AM Comments comments (0)

Axle Weight

Axle Weight    

https://www.truckingagents.net/axle-weight/

​There are a number of trailer axle configurations, weight limit rules and regulations, and terms that can make understanding axle weight intimidating. Understanding the basic terms and calculations of axle weight, along with access to the right resources will have you talking and calculating axle weight with confidence. TruckingAgents.net provides the resources and education to help make drivers, agents, brokers, and dispatchers have a better understanding of axle weight and how they affect shipments.

​Axle Types

​As with any profession, knowing the terms is necessary to have a productive conversation. Below, is a basic tractor trailer axle configuration and the axle types. When discussing axle weights, refer to the axles by the terms listed below.

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Steer Axle - As the name implies, it is the axle that a steers the tractor.

Drive Axles - The drive axles receive the power from the engine.

Trailer Axles - They are the rear axles on the trailer and they don't steer or receive power.

alxe types

Axle Types

​Axle Groups

​​An axle group can consist of 1 or more axles, and are commonly seen and referred to as the following:

One - Single Axle Group

Two - Tandem Axle Group

Three - Tri-Axle Group (Tridem)

Four - Quad Axle Group

Axle Groups

​Step Deck Trailer

Legal Axle Weights Tractor Trailer

Now that we can label the axle types and groups we can talk about axle weight.

Axle Weight - Refers to the legal allowable gross axle weight on any particular axle group and type.

Although the state's and province's axle weight limits can vary, we can discuss what is most common. A common five axle tractor trailer combination has the following axle weight limits.

gross 80,000 lbs  legal axle weight

Legal Axle Weight

12,000 + 34,000 + 34,000 = 80,000

When you add the axle group limits you get a total of 80,000 lbs, which is the standard max gross weight a tractor trailer can be without an overweight permit. This max gross weight is going to include everything:

Tractor

Trailer

Commodity

Fuel

Driver

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Tri-Axle Weight

12,000 + 28,000 + 40,000 = 80,000

Here is an example of the advantage gained by using a tri-axle trailer group. In this example image, the commodity is setting toward the back half of the trailer and so more of the commodity weight is on the trailer axles than on the drive axles. Because the trailer axle group is a tri-axle configuration it can carry more weight legally. It's important to point out that this example still does not exceed the gross weight limit of 80,000 lbs.

Van Trailer

​A van trailer has the same rules as open deck trailer equipment on axle weights, but because van trailers typically haul palletized goods the weight is generally evenly distributed over the trailer and gross weight does not exceed the 80,000 lbs limit.

​Overweight Hauling

​If the commodity hauled exceeds the axle group weight limit, then an overweight permit is required. A shipment would require an overweight permit even if only one axle group exceeds the axle group limit and the gross shipping weight does not exceed the 80,000 lbs.

Overweight Permit Load

12,000 + 30,000 + 38,000 = 80,000

​The gross limit in this example does not exceed 80,000 lbs, but the trailer tandem axles exceeds the 34,000 lbs gross weight limit. The driver could try and reposition the load to move more weight from the rear trailer axles to the drive axles. If that is not possible, the driver would be required to haul this ship​ment with an overweight permit.

Types of Trailers

Posted by Linda McCoy -McCoy & Associates LLC on October 16, 2019 at 4:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Types of Trailers

https://www.truckingagents.net/types-of-trailer

We work with a number of different types of trailers in the trucking industry and we included a list of some below. Each trailer type offers it's own specific use. In most cases, the trailers can vary in size, weight, axles, and in other ways making each trailer type varied more than what is shown here. Different trailer types require specific knowledge and understanding in order to dispatch the driver and equipment effectively.

A Note On Dimensions

* Dimensions are averages or what you are likely to see. Equipment can vary.

* Dimensions are listed in either Feet & Inches or Inches Only to match industry lingo.

* Legal commodity dimensions are provided where appropriate (platform trailers).

* Legal dimensions based on a max overall height of 13'6".

A Note On Accessories

* Accessorials can include equipment (hardware) and services.

* There are a broad range of accessories and this is not a complete list.

Van Trailer

Dimensions

Commodity Weight: 45,000 lbs

Outside Dimensions

Length: 53'

Width: 8'6"

Height: 13'6"

Inside Dimensions

Length: 52'7"

Width: 98"

Height: 110"

Description

A van trailer is the most common trailer type out there. It is primarily used to haul Freight All Kinds (FAK) of palletized goods. Typically loaded via a loading dock with a forklift, with most long haul trailers offering swing doors for easiest access to loading. Van freight is the easiest to dispatch for reasons such as:

• Fewer concerns about dimensions

• Commodities

• No tarping

• Loading and unloading is generally straight forward.

• More consistent rates

Accessories

• Air-Ride

• Straps

• Logistics Bars

• Curtain Side

• E-Track

 

• Load Bars

• Pads

• Hazmat

• Expedited / Team

• Less Than Truckload (LTL)

• Multiple Stops

Refrigerated Trailer

Dimensions

Commodity Weight: 44,000 lbs

Outside Dimensions

Length: 53'

Width: 8'6"

Height: 13'6"

Inside Dimensions

Length: 52'

Width: 98"

Height: 104"

Description

A refrigerated trailer is often called a "Refer Trailer" but would be more accurately defined as a temperature controlled trailer. The most distinguishing characteristic of a refer trailer as compared to a van trailer is the temperature control unit found on the front of the trailer. This unit will regulate the inside temperature of the trailer and keep it consistent to the commodity requirements. Because of the more specialized trailer a more experienced dispatcher is required. Rates are also higher for this more specialized trailer.

Flatbed Trailer

Dimensions

Commodity Weight: 48,000 lbs

Trailer Dimensions

Length: 48'

Width: 102" (8'6")

Deck Height: 5'

Commodity Legal Dimensions

Length: 48' some overhang

Width: 102" (8'6")

Height: 8'6"

Oversize Hauling is available

Description

A flatbed trailer is the most basic of open deck trailers or platform trailers. They offer a wide variety of hauling commodities, loading options, and accessorials. The biggest advantage is the ability to load from the side (forklift) or overhead (crane). A dispatcher needs to be well versed in all aspects of this trailer type to dispatch effectively. Rates can vary due to many factors.

Accessories

• Tarp

• Chains & Binders

• Straps

• Side Kit

• Coil Racks

• Headboard

• Blocking

• Pipe Stakes

• Hazmat

Stepdeck Trailer

Dimensions

Commodity Weight: 46,000 lbs

Trailer Dimensions

Deck Length: 53'

Primary Deck Length: 40'

Width: 102" (8'6")

Deck Height: 42" (3'6")

Commodity Legal Dimensions

Length: 40'

Width: 102" (8'6")

Height: 10'

Oversize Hauling is available

Description

A stepdeck, or dropdeck trailer, is a flatbed with a lower bottom primary deck. This lower deck allows to take higher commodity height items without having to order any over-height permits. The sacrifice is some hauling weight, but more likely available lower deck length. Historically, a stepdeck trailer was 48' long, but many fleets are going to the 53' trailer with 40' or more bottom decks. One advantage of this extra length is the ability to haul shipping containers. Otherwise, a stepdeck trailer is very familiar with a flatbed and they are often interchangeable on hauling many loads.

More Step Deck Detail

 

Accessories

• Tarp

• Chains & Binders

• Straps

• Coil Racks

• Levelers

• Hazmat

• Blocking

• Pipe Stakes

• Ramps

Double Drop Trailer

Dimensions

Commodity Weight: 42,000 lbs

Trailer Dimensions

Deck Length: 48'

Primary Deck Length: 29'

Width: 102" (8'6")

Deck Height: 18" (1'6")

Commodity Legal Dimensions

Length: 29' plus overhang

Width: 102" (8'6")

Height: 12'


Description

A double drop is an even more specialized platform trailer. Some double drops can take up to 12' high loads without the need of over-height permits. Most double drop trailers have an RGN, which is a removable gooseneck, which allows for both wheeled and tracked equipment to be driven onto the trailer under their own power. Many driver's of this specialized equipment are well versed in the hauling of oversize and overweight loads which can require permits and escorts.

Accessories

• Chains & Binders

• Straps

• Outriggers

• RGN

• Blocking

• Tarp

• 


How to spot good loads in bad markets

Posted by Linda McCoy -McCoy & Associates LLC on October 14, 2019 at 12:00 PM Comments comments (0)


FREIGHT BROKER NEGOTIATING STRATEGIES THAT WORK!

You found a load on a load board that meets your business requirements. The next step is contacting the broker to negotiate the freight rate. Rates listed on load boards are rarely “all-in”. “All-in rates” cover the hauling cost as well as assessorial fees and fuel surcharge. Brokers generally offer lower rates because that is how they make money. Do not be afraid to ask for a better freight rate, especially if it is good for your business. But don’t just pull a number out of a hat either. Be smart about your negotiations by paying attention to market trends and broker information.

Know Your Operating Cost

Before doing anything, you need to know how much it costs to run your business. Keep this amount in mind when looking at freight rates. Generally, accepting rates below your operating cost can hurt your operation and may even put you out of business. Do not be afraid to turn down low paying freight.

Pay Attention to the Drop-off Location

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Some areas have reputations for low-paying freight. For example, getting good rates going into Florida is easy; getting those same rates coming out is a different story. If you know you probably won’t get a great rate on your next load, you can prepare. Negotiate a higher rate going into the low-paying area to help cover the cost of getting out. Be careful about hauling into low-paying areas too often. Low paying freight is still risky.

Identify the Load-to-Truck Ratio

Pay attention to the number of posted trucks in your lane. They are going to want the same loads you do and influence the truck demand in your pick-up area. If there is a large number of loads and a small number of available trucks, you have room to negotiate a higher rate because your truck is in high demand. Low rates happen when there are not enough loads to go around. You can check the number of posted trucks with a quick search on your load board.

Look Up the Average Spot Rate

Load boards generally post the average spot rate for a particular load. Does the rate listed fall within the average? Remember, do not be afraid to turn down low paying freight. If the rate is low, see if the broker will come up in price.

Mark the Load’s Times

Time has significant influence over freight rates. The longer a load remains on a load board, the more anxious a broker will be to find a truck. Use this to your advantage to negotiate a higher rate. Also, consider the pick-up time. If there is a small window between when you found the load and the pick-up time, the broker may be more willing to negotiate. The drop-off time is also influential. In light of the ELD Mandate, truck drivers are keeping a closer watch on their Hours of Service (HOS). Does the drop-off time and location give you enough time to work safely with the HOS? All of these factor into the freight rate.

Ask about Fees

Some lanes are more expensive to run than others. Find out of there are any tolls along your route. Do you need special permits to haul the load? Will you be required to pay dock or lumper fees? Is the shipper or receiver known for long detention times? Will the broker honor an accrued detention rate (usually this means the broker needs to accept, sign, and send back a revised rate confirmation)? Is the fuel surcharge covered in the rate? Ask about fees and make sure they are covered in the rate.

Get Everything in Writing

Before hauling any load, get the complete and signed Broker and Carrier agreements. You also need a signed Rate Confirmation. The broker is not obligated to pay you if there is not a signed Rate Confirmation.

Verify the Broker and Shipper Information

Run a credit check on the Broker’s and Shipper’s information. Make sure you are hauling for an actual company and look out for scams. Hauling for a fraudulent company can put you out of business. You also want to know the broker’s average days-to-pay. If you cannot wait out their pay terms, you may want to look into quick pay or factoring.

When negotiating freight, ask questions. You are the only one looking out for your business, so make sure you are hauling loads that will make your business successful. Do not be afraid to negotiate. The worst that can happen is the broker says “no” and you go back to the load board. Nevertheless, this may be the smartest decision for your business.

Doft News

Heavy Haul Trucking

Posted by Linda McCoy -McCoy & Associates LLC on October 14, 2019 at 1:40 AM Comments comments (0)

Heavy Haul Trucking

Increasing Trucking Revenue

The transportation industry is made up of many segments. The heavy haul trucking industry is just one niche of the truck load industry. The heavy haul trucking industry can also be broken down into further niches as well. In this article, we discuss these niches in how they operate, what you need to know, the equipment required, and how they are rated or priced. We've provided links to pages that are useful for getting more information to detail that is not covered in this article.

​Important! There are often exceptions to some of the information provided, so it's intended to be a beginners guide to basic understanding of heavy haul loads.

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​The 3 basic categories of Heavy Haul Trucking

Oversize - Refers to loads that exceed the legal Length, Width, or Height.

Overweight - Refers to loads that exceed the legal weight of a shipment.

Superloads - Refers to loads that exceed even the more standard oversize or overweight loads. These loads are either very big or very heavy or both.

​Permits & Escorts

​Heavy heavy loads are often defined as those loads that require permits and/or escorts.

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Permits: A permit is required by the state you are hauling the oversize load through. Permit costs and requirements can vary by state and so a driver must be careful to know what each state's requirements and costs are to travel with an oversize load.

​Escorts: When a load exceeds certain sizes, often a state will require and escort, often referred to as a pilot car, to either lead or follow the load. In some cases a police escort can also be required.

​Review State Permit & Escort Information Here

​City & County Permits

​A driver can always expect a state permit to be required, but more and more cities and counties are beginning to require their own permits as well. Typically, these permits are required when the load originates or delivers in the city or county in which they are traveling. In other words, a load traveling on the interstate through a city or county may not be required to have a city or county permit. Only if the load leaves the interstate will one be required.

​Routing

​When a driver applies for a permit in a given state, they are required to submit a route they will take through that state. The state permit office will either accept the route or provide a different route. Routing changes can have big financial consequences by adding on a lot more miles than initially planned. Unfortunately, it's not always knowable about what routing will be excepted, so when pricing an oversize load, some considerations to re-routing may be figured.

​Oversize Loads

​80' Long x 12' Wide x 14'6" High

​​Someone who understands platform hauling on equipment like flatbeds, stepdecks, and double drops​​​, might want to explore the world of heavy haul trucking. The oversize loads that fall into the dimensions above is a great place to start. These loads generally will require only permits to haul the load and are therefore, easier to haul and to rate.

States generally follow the same guidelines at these sizes, but routing changes can add on further restrictions or require escorts.

​Estimate State Permit Costs

​Overweight Loads

​When a load exceeds the legal weight limit of 80,000 lbs, an overweight permit is required. It's important to note that an overweight load may not be oversize, although they certainly can be. The states vary in cost and requirements to overweight loads. The biggest challenge to understanding costs is that the formulas used by the states vary and can be a bit complicated. A thorough understanding of the trailer equipment is required. A driver or dispatcher needs to know what the trailer capabilities are so they don't try to haul a load that will exceed the state's limits.

​Understanding Axle Weights

​Superloads

​A state will provide their routine permit limits. Loads that exceed these limits are considered super loads and require a lot more information, requirements, and costs to haul. Someone in this industry has years of experience in hauling large oversize and overweight loads. These loads are very expensive to haul and often can take weeks or even months of planning.

​Super Load Hauling

​Higher Revenue

​Working in the heavy haul trucking business requires a more specific skill set then dry van freight hauling. The knowledge required and equipment used are more valuable, therefore, rates and costs are generally going to be considerably higher. Taking the time to learn and enter this market can be well worth the time as long as you take your time and start on smaller loads and work your way up to larger and heavier loads over time.

Increasing Trucking Revenue    -  TRUCKING AGENTS


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